J Meager Interview

Please describe a typical week’s training? Depending on the time of year, an average training week would consist of 25+ hours, split between swim, bike, run and gym work.  Structure is something that works really well for me, so I ensure each month, week or day is planned in great detail.  However, no training week is ever the same as the previous week.  This is something that keeps motivation high, therefore maintaining training interesting.  As the season approaches, training changes slightly, with race fitness becoming the main focus.  I love what I do and it wouldn’t be possible without the support from Rocktape and Odlo, two of the best sponsors that I cannot thank enough! What is your favourite training activity? I love all three aspects of my sport, but of course I do have a favourite.  The bike is my favoured discipline and I look forward to the long rides on my training programme every week.  The weather sometimes has a part to play and occasionally the turbo trainer acts as a replacement, but there is nothing better than riding up and down mountains on a training camp in the sun. What is you least favourite training activity? Training in England over the winter can be difficult at times, but with good mental strength nothing stops us.  Come about April time it is just about warm enough to start some open water swim training.  When the water is freezing and I am shivering, I realise this is definitely my least favourite training activity, especially when I get out and cannot feel my feet for hours.  If it was...
GB Badminton star, Fontaine Chapman, talks us through an average week at the sharp end of sport

GB Badminton star, Fontaine Chapman, talks us through an average week at the sharp end of sport

Please describe a typical week’s training? Monday 8am-10am: On-court or physical session.  If I have competed over a weekend then I will rest Monday morning. 12pm-1.30pm: Strength & conditioning session with my s&c coach Brendan Chaplin, followed by soft tissue massage. 5pm-7pm: On-court session with my coach James Vincent (we call him Vinny) and other performance players at Leeds Metropolitan University for attacking training and match practice. Tuesday 7am-9am: On-court session, which may include some physical exercises such as burpees, plyometric drills or sprints to tire myself out before doing consistency or attacking practices. 11.15pm-12.30pm:  Strength & conditioning circuit session plus core work and sprints Spinning session 1-1.45pm if I’m not a university lectures. 5pm-7pm:  On-court session with my coach Harry Wright (an ex England international player) and other performance players at Leeds met.  Training & match practice, but mainly matches around competition times. Wednesday 7am-9am:  On-court session with lighter skills if we’re competing or if we have a university match. Light skills consist of practicing shots and working on our racket reaction speed. 9am-9.45am:  Soft tissue massage. If I am competing in an international tournament I will leave on Wednesday, so sometimes I may not train.  We often have University matches, home or away, on Wednesday afternoons from 1pm and these can take up a lot of time.  I also coach a junior badminton club in Horsforth in Leeds for 3 hours in the evening. Thursday 7am-9am:  On-court session with Vinny and the performance group – a tough physical session or match practice if we are competing on the weekend. 9am-9.30am:  Physical cardio vascular session either on the...
Rocktape catches up with GB middle/long distance runner, Jonny Mellor

Rocktape catches up with GB middle/long distance runner, Jonny Mellor

Please describe a typical week’s training? A typical week’s training usually involves 2 or 3 sessions per day, dependant on the time of the year and how close it is to any competitions.  Between sessions I am currently studying for my Personal Training qualifications. Sunday is long run day, which is normally between 13 and 20 miles.  I follow this with a swim session in the evening. Mondays are normally a double run day, with steady mileage, and then a gym session of basic strength and conditioning work to target some of my weaknesses and other key areas for runners such as the glutes and hips. Tuesdays are session days, which can target tempo, hills or track work depending on the time of year.  I supplement my hard session with an easy morning run, or an evening recovery run if I train in the morning. Wednesdays are again steady running days with gym and swim sessions. Thursdays vary through the year, but during the current base-building phase they consist of a medium to long run. Fridays used to be an easy day, but I’m adding some quality running to give me an extra day of recovery following Tuesday and an extra day before the Sunday long run.  Again, I will supplement the workout with an easy recovery or morning run. Saturdays have now become my recovery day and I find it important to listen to my body on this day to ensure I recover properly from the week’s training as it is a vital part of my programme.  I normally run anywhere between 5 and 10 miles. I won’t...
Lani Belcher Interview

Lani Belcher Interview

This week we talk to ex Under-23 European Champion and current GB kayaker, Lani Belcher. Please describe a typical week’s training? We’ve just changed our routine from 6 days on and then 1 day off, to 12 on, 2 off.  The change has also seen the number of daily sessions go from three to two, but both sessions are absolutely max intensity, so we need the hours in between to recover.  In a 6 day period, we’d have 4 morning paddles and 2 morning run sessions, with afternoons alternating between upper and lower body strength sessions, usually in the gym.  We’ll do yoga once each week around midday, otherwise the time spent between morning and afternoon sessions is used for serious recovery efforts. Winter training involves more endurance work. What is your favourite training activity? As I come from a marathon background, I love the endurance sessions (2km) where you can ride the wash of the paddler in front until it’s your turn to do the work.  They are shattering efforts, but enjoyable. What is you least favourite training activity? We do ‘split 500m’ sessions that are a real nightmare.  200m max effort, 100m recovery, repeated once before a final 100m burst.  They really build up lactic acid and hurt a lot.  The 300m sessions are even worse and are almost guaranteed to make us vomit. What is the single most important or effective part of your training? Technique, because without it all the power in the world will get you nowhere.  We practice drills that reinforce the vital connection between upper and lower body.  It’s a common misconception...
Emily Sarsfield Interview

Emily Sarsfield Interview

Emily Sarsfield is Britain’s No1 Ski Cross racer, the first British woman to win a Skiing Europa Cup race and one of our best chances for a medal at the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics. Emily started using Rocktape in 2009 when recovering from a serious knee injury. Now back to full health, she talks us through her current training regime. Talk us through a typical week’s training? Pre-season started in September, so I am travelling back and forth between the mountains and the UK every 10 days. The heavy weights sessions have died down a little and we are now focused on power, quick movement and plyometric based training. I’m still training 5 days a week, with 3 weights/power sessions, 4 core sessions (a really important thing in skiing and especially ski cross where we are often off balance) and 4 interval sessions, along with a Pilates and yoga session too to keep everything supple and strong inside to out. An average day right now would be a 6am start for some mobility exercises, getting on the skis from 7:30am and doing jumps, technical training and riding ski cross tracks until lunch. After a refuel there’ll be a quick nap and lactate recovery to prevent ‘heavy’ legs the next morning (usually a spin session or ice bath, but my favourite method at the moment involves Fire Fly recovery bands that I place on my legs). The afternoon will finish with a core or weights session. Being a skier definitely isn’t all powder skiing and après ski! What is your favourite training activity? This will sound odd to anyone who...
Ailbhe Carroll Interview

Ailbhe Carroll Interview

With a background in Gaelic Games and horse riding, Ailbhe Carroll is not your average triathlete. Here Ailbhe talks us through a typical week of training and lets us in on some of here loves and hates. It’s exhausting just reading about it… Describe your typical week? My typical week is filled to the brim. Every weekday morning (sometimes Saturdays, depending on races, etc.) I’ll hear the alarm go off at 4.31 and make my way to the pool. We swim with the HPC in University of Limerick Arena from 5-7ish, then I hop back into bed for a quick snooze before starting work at 10. During the week after work, I’ll fit in four runs (one or two track sessions during winter) and one run on the weekend also. Biking takes over the weekends, with two turbos-trainer sessions added during the winter or two or three spin classes during the week if the weather’s good. Gym work is majorly important for me as I’m prone to having an injured back (hence me needing Rocktape’s help), so I do three sessions per week to keep me intact. That totals 5/6 swims, 4/5 runs, 4/5 bikes and 3 gyms. All go, but so much fun! What is your favourite training activity? My favourite training activity is definitely swimming. I think I grew fond of it due to my club. I only started club swimming at 18 (late starter) and I just fell in love with the set up and the bonds and friendships made. They make training so much easier. What is you least favourite training activity? For me, the...
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