Customer Thank You

Customer Thank You

We received this wonderful email from a happy customer recently. Thank You Megan! To The ROCKTAPE Team I just wanted to drop you a quick line to say thank you for your wonderful kinesiology tape! In April 2012 I had my 3rd knee operation and was told it was unlikely I would be able to run distance again. This happened mid way through me training for my first marathon, which would have been at the time of me recovering from surgery as it happened. During the recovery process I was recommended ROCKTAPE kinesiology tape by my physio. The collective operations mean that I have minimal cartilage on the back of my knee cap and so the grinding motion of most sports risk the knee cap flaking, which has happened in the past. I was shown how to apply the tape to raise the knee cap slightly to prevent this happening and, with the help of the tape, have completed 2 half marathons, my first and second marathon (London and Edinburgh) and my first ever ultra marathon since February 2013; raising nearly £5000 for charity in the process. I had a whole roll of ROCKTAPE with me for the ultra and used it for any pain or injury incurred, it was an ongoing joke that I looked like I was re-building myself! I truly believe that my knee would not hold up without the kinesiology tape, it hurt during a 4 mile run without it, yet 169 miles passed with not even a twinge in my knee. I have booked 2 more ultras since completing the first, a 50 mile...
Rocktape Skiing Test

Rocktape Skiing Test

Physiotherapist Angus Wood recently carried out some fairly radical tests using Rocktape.  Here he discusses his findings… I used a skier dressed in ‘Skins’ compression gear and stuck the tape to the clothing as a visual guide.  Anterior, Posterior and Lateral tapings were applied according to the movement patterns that can be used in skiing. He was assessed initially to see where any restrictions were, which included left side bending and reduced forward flexion with a shallow lordosis.  Rotation was similar, reduced to the left. What I asked of Richard (the skier) was to ski a narrow corridor of short radius turns, which would show the most movement patterns, e.g. rotation of the lower limb, separation at the pelvis and side bending of the torso, as well as extension and flexion movements.  Common issues in ski performance are related to lack of symmetry in movements and poor skiing posture. With the tape applied to the skins it was easier to see where issues were arising in Richard’s skiing.  There was a lack of commitment in some of the turns, where he was either not using his inside ski or there was not the same degree of rotation going on through either leg.  In the longer radius turns the issue was the amount of lateral separation. Following taping to the actual skin,(then wearing skins over the top to maintain scientific rigour) we repeated the same exercise and the results were very interesting.  The turn initiation (weight transfer and rotation of skis) was much smoother with a more symmetrical appearance.  The longer turn radius offered a smooth transition and potentially an increased edge angle (Richard was able to...
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