5 Best Taping Applications for CrossFitters

5 Best Taping Applications for CrossFitters

Don’t let aches and pains be an excuse. Tape up and get to work. Because of the way RockTape stimulates nerve receptors in your skin and deeper tissues, it also can downregulate pain and improve both mobility and stability. With plenty of upsides, here are picks for the top five best CrossFit applications for RockTape: Hands Every CrossFit athlete knows how easy it is to beat up your hands while training. RockTape can effectively protect your palms and those calluses you’ve worked so hard on, especially when your training involves lots of metal spinning in your hands. (Think kipping pull-ups and kettlebell snatches, for example.) This application requires some scissors work, but once you’ve done it a couple of times, you’ll feel like a pro! Adhere two strips down the palms of your hands and a strip around your wrist to lock them down. All your calluses should be covered and your palms virtually encased in armor. RockTape takes chalk nicely — and unlike most gloves — the layers of tape are so thin you’ll barely notice there’s anything between you and the work you’re doing. Shoulders Just about everything in CrossFit requires both shoulder mobility and stability. Whether you’re upside down on your hands, pressing overhead, or doing pull-ups or Olympic lifts, the demand on your shoulders is exceptional. We recommend taping in a way that basically surrounds the deltoid muscle while hitting the upper traps and AC joint (the point of your shoulder). Make sure you use enough tape on one of the strips to extend back onto your shoulder blade. Most of the mobility and stability...
RockTape® Sponsors the 2016 Reebok CrossFit® Games

RockTape® Sponsors the 2016 Reebok CrossFit® Games

CrossFitters around the world have been competing all year long, vying for a chance to make it to the 2016 Reebok CrossFit Games taking place July 19-24, 2016, at the StubHub Center in Carson, California. RockTape, a leader in sports medicine products and education, is proud to announce its seventh year of support of the annual CrossFit Games, which will be commemorating its 10th year of competition in July. This year, 323,000 athletes from 175 countries signed up to participate in the CrossFit Games Open––a five week competition and the qualifying round for the CrossFit Games Regionals, where the top men, women and teams from seventeen regions competed at seven regional events in the U.S., Europe and Australia for a chance at the finals. Now 40 men, 40 women, 40 teams, 40 teenagers, and 200 Masters athletes will battle it out for the podium at the Games.   RockTape will be supporting Airrosti, the official athlete care provider of the CrossFit Games, to help keep the Games athletes going throughout the multi-day, multi-event competition. “We’re happy to have RockTape’s support for the 2016 season,” said Justin Bergh, General Manager of the CrossFit Games. “RockTape’s focus on sports performance aligns with our search to find the fittest on earth and we’re glad to have their support again this year.” The Games is not only a display of strength but also of endurance and other physical skills such as flexibility, agility, power, speed and coordination. “Athletes are subjected to unknown workouts and challenges during the week while competing against the fittest people on earth,” says RockTape CEO Greg van den Dries....
A Day in a Box with Steph “The Hammer” Hammerman

A Day in a Box with Steph “The Hammer” Hammerman

Steph “the Hammer” Hammerman recently visited us up at RockTape HQ, so naturally we couldn’t pass up the opportunity to watch her train with Neal Maddox and Chris Hinshaw at CrossFit X-treme Athletics. For those of you who haven’t heard of Steph’s story, check out this CNN interview. We weren’t sure what would happen—filming without a script, a plan, or expectations—when we joined her at CrossFit X-treme Athletics with Coach and CrossFit Games Competitor Neal Maddox and famed endurance coach Chris Hinshaw. We arrived a bit late so we thought we missed the magic. A TrueFormâ„¢ Treadmill was already set up under a pull-up rig with a Ring Thing® hoisted above. Just as we were about to pack it up and cut our losses, Steph casually walks over to the rig and Neal helped her in—using the rings to anchor the harness. We were skeptical about this entire setup. It looked fragile, awkward… we definitely weren’t prepared for this.   With a huge smile on her face, she started running.   Typically, Steph uses her crutches to support herself while running. It’s inspiring, but you can see the struggle. This puts a lot of pressure on her arms and less on her legs. In this moment, she is still supporting herself with the railings, but the power output from her legs is obviously increasing—Chris gives updates on her speed and confirms her mile time has improved. Interestingly, one of the most inspiring moments was watching Steph ask Neal for a little more assistance. With just that bit of extra support from Neal, she was able to let go of the railings and experience something entirely new. She walked...

Running with Rocktape

I’ve got to admit, it’s a bit strange writing an informative blog post. I’m used to sticking on updates about how training’s going (or not going!) and what’s been happening as I raise money for my charity. But this is a little different today so you’re going to have to bear with me as I scratch around for a decent introduction. This post is, essentially, about the benefits of Rocktape, and how I feel it has helped me get to where I am now. But to write that, I’d better fill you in on ‘where I am now’! I’m 20 and I’ve always felt a bit of a need to keep fit, since I was a young child – probably down to the fact my mum always made sure to keep up a routine of gym work and healthy eating herself. Naturally, when I was very young, it was a case of everywhere mum went I went – there’s a picture of me pretending to use the sit up machine aged 5! At about 14/15 I enjoyed running a mile or two, but only to keep in shape for riding (we’ve always had horses and I’m now a riding instructor). I don’t think I really considered ever being a ‘proper’ runner. But then, two years ago, I went for a run and got lost (anyone who reads my blog will know what a diabolical sense of direction I have). I’m never one for stopping during a run so I just kept running….and running until eventually I managed to work my way back to where I started. When I had...
Kinesiology tape shown to help acute low back pain

Kinesiology tape shown to help acute low back pain

Acute low back pain is very common, and a condition that affects a large proportion of the population at some stage throughout their life. Kinesiology tape has been shown to be an effective early intervention in a recent study from Turkey. In this study, 109 subjects with acute low back pain were allocated into two groups. Both groups received the same intervention consisting of information regarding lumbar pain, correct lifting techniques and advice re sleeping positions. They were also given reassurance about the benign nature of their pain, and advice re keeping active within pain limits. Both groups were allowed to take paracetamol as required. The intervention group also had kinesiology tape applied to their low backs in a star, or “zapper” formation. (See our website for a video on how the “zapper” is applied). The tape was applied three times, and left in place for four days each time. This gave a total taped duration of 12 days. The researchers measured pain on a VAS, determining a priori that their MCID (minimal clinically important difference) would be a reduction in this score of 3.5cm. They also utilised the Oswestry score as a measure of disability, and also the number of paracetamol tablets consumed. The study found that the VAS had reduced by the pre-determined 3.5cm by day six in the taped group, compared with day twelve in the control group. The Oswestry score was significantly reduced in the taped group at twelve days when compared with the control group, and it was still better four weeks later but this was not quite at a statistically significant level. The...
The Secret to Recovery: Crossfit Open 2016 by Jeffrey Kurtz (RockDoc)

The Secret to Recovery: Crossfit Open 2016 by Jeffrey Kurtz (RockDoc)

You have eaten right, trained hard, and mentally have prepared for the Open 2016. You may have had an injury on and off in the last year, but have struggled through it. You may have even struggled with going to the Box for your workouts because you felt burned out. Now you dig deep for the best performance possible and maybe or maybe not you are meeting your expectations. Some of these symptoms are signs of OVERtraining. Other signs include chronic injuries, loss of motivation, and increased susceptibility to injury resulting in stupid little injuries that start to add up or are just painful enough to annoy you and affect your performance. Overtraining occurs when we have an imbalance between the anaerobic and aerobic systems in the body. Many sports are anaerobic, aerobic, or both. Some sports that are thought to be aerobic are actually anaerobic based on the intensity of the exercise that causes a specific sympathetic response in the nervous and endocrine systems. Sports like weightlifting, crossfit, hockey, football (soccer), and tennis are anaerobic. Things like walking, running, and cycling are anaerobic, BUT it depends on the intensity of the training. There are two gears to our nervous system: there is the fight or flight state (sympathetic) and the rest and digest state (parasympathetic). When we are under stress our nervous system goes into a fight or flight response and we release specific hormones from our adrenal glands (nebennierre) which help us manage the situation. The sympathetic response will constrict blood vessels, dilate the pupils, increase blood flow to the muscles and away from the digestive organs,...
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