Rocktape: A short guide to applying it yourself

Rocktape: A short guide to applying it yourself

ROCKTAPE is a brand of Kinesiolgy tape that was developed in the USA and is now available in more than 10 countries worldwide.  Barry Spencer is a Chartered Physiotherapist and Medical Development Director for Rocktape.  In this article Barry explains how to safely and effectively apply Rocktape. To get the most effective results and value for money when using Rocktape, it is important to apply your tape correctly and look after it once it’s on.  Tape that is well applied and looked after will generally last between 3-5 days, though this does vary with individual skin types and the body parts taped. Each roll of Rocktape comes with a leaflet containing instructions on how to apply tape for some common problems and, in addition to this, below are some simple rules that will help you ensure you apply your tape well.  Video demonstrations of how to apply tape can also be viewed at  www.rocktape.net/how-to-use/ If you are in any way unsure of whether your injury/problem is appropriate for taping, then you should consult a medical professional. For a list of qualified Rock Doc’s in your area, go to http://www.rocktape.co.uk/rock-docs/ and enter your postcode. Be careful when taping over a body part/person with the following: • History of tape allergy (these are usual latex based though and Rocktape has no latex) • Fragile or healing skin • Deep Venous Thrombosis • Don’t tape over the following type of skin • Areas treated with radiation in the past 6 months • Open wounds • Infected areas • Skin preparation • If you’re concerned about an allergy, apply a small (1cm x...
Rock Tape Study: Helen Wyman

Rock Tape Study: Helen Wyman

Us professional athletes tend to err on the side of caution and often feel even the slightest niggle can lead to a terminal issue. Some may even call us hypochondriacs; probably with good reason. I race cyclo-cross, an off-road cycling discipline ridden over grass, sand, mud, snow and ice, depending on the course and time of year. Having been national champion 6 times in this discipline, I’ve had my fair share of racing incidents. However, as you age, you pick up training injuries too. Recently, when training off road, I spent a lot of time attacking sand banks to practice carrying enough speed to get over them and ended up with a very slight acromioclavicular joint (ACJ) ligament tear. Your AC joint is the point where the collar bone joins the shoulder blade at the top of shoulder.  The lowest grade tear leads to pain on most shoulder movements and in particular bringing your arm across your body. When sprinting out of the saddle this is quite an important movement, so it was vital to fix it pretty quickly. The picture below shows the anatomy of the shoulder and a grade 3 separation (fortunately my injury is a grade 1 partial injury and nowhere near as severe). Having been a physiotherapist in a previous life, I was able to self diagnose and counter diagnosis with university friends who are still therapists. The general rule of treatment for an injury of this nature is rest, ice and anti-inflammatory medication for the first week alongside taping during exercise. I have never used rock tape before and I was seriously impressed with...
ROCKTAPE talks to Team GB volleyball star Shauna Mullin

ROCKTAPE talks to Team GB volleyball star Shauna Mullin

Why beach volleyball over indoor volleyball? I represented Scotland indoors for years before switching to the beach.  Once I had experienced high-level beach volleyball, I couldn’t stay away.  With beach volleyball, there are 2 players, as opposed to 6 indoors.  So the opposition can target one player, meaning you need a more rounded skill set. Indoors, the coach plays a major roll – they are in constant communication with their players.  On the beach, the coach has to leave ten minutes before the start and plays no further part, so you have to be self-sufficient. The fundamentals of the games don’t differ, but we swap ends more often on the beach to minimise any advantage that could be gained from weather conditions. What constitutes an average day’s training for you? Our year has 3 phases: pre-season, season and off-season.  Pre-season will usually be 2 to 3 sessions a day, 6 days a week.  1 physical session a day (weight lifting or cardio), 1 technical sand session and 1 body control session, where motor patterns are ingrained using medicine balls, benches or therabands. As we get closer to the season, we focus more on performance, with more match type scenarios, including mental aspects.  Year round we also have psychology meetings, video analysis, ice-bath/swimming pool/ocean recovery sessions, physiotherapy and massage. I’m usually in bed by 8.30 as sleep is important to me. What are your favourite and least favourite sessions? I love to play, so my favourite times are when we get to the competitive game drills. ‘Max testing’ is horrible, because you have to lift such heavy weights, and cardio...

Rocktape and how it works

In the first of a series of articles, Barry Spencer, a Chartered Physiotherapist and Medical Development Director for Rocktape who also has a Physiotherapy clinic in Burgess Hill, introduces us to the basics of Kinesiolgy tape or, as most of us will know it, Rocktape.  Barry has recently completed the 1st CrossFit training day at CrossFit Bold. Seen the bright coloured tape over elite athletes in the Olympics?  Wondered what it is and what it does?  It’s called Kinesiology Tape and it ‘s received plenty of publicity of late. Kinesiology tape was developed in Japan in the 70’s and, up until recently, it has been mainly used in the Far East. During the Beijing Olympics several high profile athlete wore Kinesiology tape and, since then, the Western World has become much more interested. When Kinesiology tape was developed, it was thought that different colours had different effects, along the lines of colour therapy.  Black was to give more power, blue for cooling and pink to provide warmth. These days the various colours and patterned tape you see are just a bit of fun added to what is becoming an increasingly popular rehabilitation tool. Kinesiology tape is a cotton/nylon weave that contains no drugs, potions or magic. The adhesive on the back of the tape is acrylic based, which means it is gentle to the skin. Most people have no problems with their skin when wearing Kinesiology tape, even those who have had prior issues with other latex-based tape products. Depending on the brand used, how well it is applied, the skin type and activity levels of the wearer, Kinesiology...
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