Top 5 RockTape Applications for Cyclists

Top 5 RockTape Applications for Cyclists

Obviously, RockTape isn’t going to help you avoid a head injury, so be sure to always wear a helmet, keep your bike professionally maintained and in good working order and ride to your ability, but for those less traumatic injuries, RockTape can be your best friend! Let’s look at the top five applications for cyclists: 1. Knee pain – knee pain can be triggered by a lot of factors on your bike, including your pedals and cleat position, crank arm length and your position on the saddle. But, once knee pain starts, it can be tough to manage, so in the meantime of getting your equipment dialed in, use RockTape for recovery as well as during rides to help keep your knees happy and healthy. This standard knee application works wonders for general knee soreness around the joint line or underneath your kneecap. This single-strip application can work just as well and is so easy to do before a ride you’ll be amazed. Another source of lateral (outside) knee pain is from the iliotibial band of tissue that runs from your hip to your knee, and here’s a great taping application for the IT band area. 2. Lower back pain – especially for road riders and triathletes (but mountain bikers certainly aren’t immune!), your bike position can put a lot of strain on your lower back. There are many ways to tape the lower back, and feel free to bump this same taping application up to the midback and between your shoulder blades if that’s where your problem seems to be. Here are taping applications for lower back support...
Kinesiology tape shown to help acute low back pain

Kinesiology tape shown to help acute low back pain

Acute low back pain is very common, and a condition that affects a large proportion of the population at some stage throughout their life. Kinesiology tape has been shown to be an effective early intervention in a recent study from Turkey. In this study, 109 subjects with acute low back pain were allocated into two groups. Both groups received the same intervention consisting of information regarding lumbar pain, correct lifting techniques and advice re sleeping positions. They were also given reassurance about the benign nature of their pain, and advice re keeping active within pain limits. Both groups were allowed to take paracetamol as required. The intervention group also had kinesiology tape applied to their low backs in a star, or “zapper” formation. (See our website for a video on how the “zapper” is applied). The tape was applied three times, and left in place for four days each time. This gave a total taped duration of 12 days. The researchers measured pain on a VAS, determining a priori that their MCID (minimal clinically important difference) would be a reduction in this score of 3.5cm. They also utilised the Oswestry score as a measure of disability, and also the number of paracetamol tablets consumed. The study found that the VAS had reduced by the pre-determined 3.5cm by day six in the taped group, compared with day twelve in the control group. The Oswestry score was significantly reduced in the taped group at twelve days when compared with the control group, and it was still better four weeks later but this was not quite at a statistically significant level. The...
The “0%” – Kinesiology Tape Doesn’t Make You Stronger

The “0%” – Kinesiology Tape Doesn’t Make You Stronger

0%. Null. Nothing. Nada. Zilch. The September 2015 issue of Men’s Health proclaimed this is the amount of “measurable change in people’s strength when they lifted weights” while wearing kinesiology tape.[1] We’ve been telling people the same thing since the first Fascial Movement Taping course we ever taught, so this is hardly news to RockTape or to the thousands of people who’ve been trained by us. This latest revelation from Men’s Health is attributed to the Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport. We can only assume they’re talking about Csapo and Alegre’s paper that was published in that journal in 2014.[2] The paper concludes that the best evidence seems to point to the fact that putting kinesiology tape on doesn’t make you magically stronger. And we agree. Traditionally, it was thought and taught by other groups that depending on which direction you apply kinesiology tape you can strengthen or weaken muscles. Very complicated approaches using elaborate tape applications were founded on this idea. These approaches still get taught by some people today, despite all the evidence to the contrary. Several studies, like the one mentioned earlier, do not lend support to the idea that tape can be used to strengthen and weaken muscles. This is actually great news that RockTape embraced early on because it frees people to use our tape without having to fuss over which direction and “over which muscles” to apply it. That makes it faster and easier to apply, so what’s not to like? So, we hate to burst anyone’s bubble, but Men’s Health and the Journal of Science and Medicine in Sport are...
Movement Beyond Mobility

Movement Beyond Mobility

Our new Movement Beyond Mobility course is in the final stages of development and I thought our blog readership would like us to share some of the things we discovered while developing this course. It’s been an exciting experience, as we have been required to hone our physical ability to perform and present the techniques in addition to the theoretical content, its left us fitter and feeling a few years younger – we are eager to share these outcomes with our students at the British School of Osteopathy in London on the 15th of November. One of our overarching messages is the importance of movement and all of the systems that allow this to occur. Your clients and patients are likely to have read the recent reports regarding the latest health scare. I am not talking about Smoking, Cholesterol, Sugar, or Alcohol. This time it’s sitting – yes just SITTING. According to the research even FIT people are likely to be guilty of sitting too much. One fact that caught me by surprise is that even if you exercise for 30 minutes everyday, if you then spend the rest of the day predominantly sitting you are still categorised as sedentary with the associated health risks, which include, obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. Like many jobs, working for RockTape UK involves lots of sitting, to answer emails, write course content, reading research, and inevitable travel up and down the UK. One aspect of the job does provide some compensation for this and is considered the most rewarding part of what I do – Teaching. The new Movement Beyond mobility course...
Spiral Squat Chain Taping

Spiral Squat Chain Taping

It’s always nice to find some research that backs up what we find useful in clinic. Anyone who has taken a FMT course will be familiar with the Spiral squat chain taping that we teach. This study by Song et al examines the effect of a very similar taping (basically it’s the top half of the application hip-knee) on female patients with patello-femoral pain (and a control group without pain) during a single leg squat movement. The study compared 2 taping techniques, one group with no stretch on tape and the leg in neutral posture. The second group had taping with ‘moderate stretch’ on tape with the leg in an externally rotated position. The first group is a little like our symptom reduction taping and the second group is pretty much exactly how we would tape as a dynamic postural taping. They found that in the PFP group both taping applications where effective in reducing pain on squats, but only the second taping application was effective in altering the pattern of movement and muscle contraction seen during the squat. The take home message here is if all you want to achieve is pain reduction, apply tape with little to no stretch. More stretch won’t create more relief. On the other hand if you want to use tape to alter posture and movement patterns it might be a good idea to consider apply tape in the corrected position and using a little more tape stretch, however if you do this you are inevitably upping the risk of skin reaction so avoid tape stretch over delicate areas and go gentle on...
Athlete Profile : Adam Everett

Athlete Profile : Adam Everett

Athlete Profile : Adam Everett Taekwon-do Junior Heavyweight world champion 2014 Adult British Welterweight champion patterns and sparing 2015 Qualified to represent England at the upcoming European Championships Adam is a key member of the Elite Academy at Truro College run by UKSCA coach Jamie Wilcocks. Physiotherapy is provided onsite by Rocktape tutor Daniel Lawrence who manages the Sports Injury Clinic in addition to his lecturing role in Truro. Daniel commented: Adams training is very intensive and although he has largely avoided injury this year he has required some assistance with recovery and maintaining full pain-free movement. We have utilised a range of treatments including passive mobilisation, MET, and soft tissue treatments. Adam has been using Rocktape for a couple of years to help reduce thoracic spine pain and to improve postural awareness. Adams comments on his training: I am now 18 but began training when I was 5. I train 4 nights a week, sometimes increasing to 6 nights a week in preparation for competitions, at Richards TKD St Austell and Falmouth with my instructors Mark and Wendy Richards, who have taught me since the beginning of my Taekwon-do career and prepare me with the necessary training to compete at the level that I do. I have participated in 2 European Championships in Naples and Barcelona respectively and 2 World Championships in Ottawa. Aspirations: By winning at national competitions, I have qualified to represent England at the upcoming European Championships in Moldova in July and I hope that here I will achieve at my first international competition as an adult competitor. Later in my Taekwon-do career, I would...
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