Carl Sanderson Tough Mudder

Carl Sanderson Tough Mudder

Hi, I’m Carl Sanderson, A  41 year old with  Haemophilia A, a bleeding disorder  where my blood doesn’t clot probably. So doing 1 Tough Mudder event is a challenge in itself. This year my challenge is to complete all the 16 Tough Mudder events in the UK. This will be done over 8 weekends, so running the Saturday and Sunday at each event. My reason is to raise awareness for Haemophilia and help change the image of how others see us.   I want to raise enough money to provide a fun and educational treatment room for the children and their families affected by bleeding disorders at The RVI Newcastle, Haemophilia Centre. This will help them understand the condition and treatments better. I have use a number of different brands of sports/kinesiology tape over the pass a year or so, but all came off before I needed it too. I contacted ROCKTAPE to see if they tape would stay on over the course of my weekend events. “Best to go for our H20 tape, same price, industrial strength adhesive J” is the replyI got back. After being taped up by my physiotherapist on the Friday morning, it stayed on through 2 Tough Mudder events 3 showers and a hot bath when I got home. H2o ROCKTAPE is the tape I will use from now on! If you wish to help you can donate on my Just Giving page www.justgiving.com/carlsanderson Also check out my Facebook page for more details on my Tough Mudder Charity Challenge...
Sam Brearey Interview

Sam Brearey Interview

Sam is a young dinghy sailor, who already at the age of 25 has a proven track record on the international stage. Sam is a double world champion, triple European champion and double national champion. His skill set has been best shown in single trapeze dinghies such as the 420 where he set a British record, the 470 which he now campaigns towards the Olympic Games and the Fireball which he has won numerous titles in. While his ability and performance on the international stage is unquestionable, Sam also finds time to give back into sport. Sam represents 3 charities all of which give him the opportunity to support the development of young people across the country. Sam spends his free time supporting projects aimed at getting young people into education, sport, employment and training. Sam also makes sure he uses his knowledge and experience to support the development of young sailors, helping coach their skills to develop the next Olympic champion. Outside of Sam’s giving back to charity, he also mentors other athletes helping guide them on their journeys through sport and beyond. Sam’s dedication to training and development is well beyond his years, taking detail in all his preparation is key to his performance. Having made a difficult decision in 2009 to finish education and not chase his dream of London 2012, Sam has recently quit his full time job to become a full time sailor looking towards Tokyo 2020. In order to ensure he has a strong full back post sport, Sam is successfully running his own business in sport around his training, while also being...
Laura Faulkner Interview

Laura Faulkner Interview

Sport: Crossfit Occupation: HR Assistant at Bath Spa University Age: 21 Height: 157cm Weight: 50kg What inspired you to take up Crossfit? I first started Crossfit with the intention to get fit. This has obviously then spiralled completely out of control! BUT something really clicked between myself and the sport. It was exciting and left me feeling completely lifeless afterwards but full of achievement. My training from when I first began Crossfit has completely changed, I started just by participating in the classes run by Crossfit Bath which is where my learning curve began. These classes are second to none and I would not be where I am now without the coaches, classes and Crossfit Bath itself. I have a lot to thank them for. Whereas now I am on an individual training programme, programmed by Ollie Mansbridge which gives me more focus and drive towards goals. It focuses more on my weakness and increasing and maintaining my strength. Please describe a typical week’s training? A typical week of training would include 5 days on, 1 active recovery day and a rest day. These training session would normally be about 2 hours long as I have to fit in my training after the working day!! Here is a glance at yesterday’s training: As Crossfit covers such a wide variety of movements my training is always so varied but here is an example of yesterday’s programming… My Warm up would include a light row/run and then something like Handstand walks to get moving. •    On the minute for every minute: 2 x Clean + 1 Jerk – Build Heavy, start approx 70% of max...
Up Close with GB Heptathlete Devon Byrne

Up Close with GB Heptathlete Devon Byrne

Sport: Heptathlon (100m Hurdles, High jump, Shot putt, 200m, Long jump, Javelin & 800m) Occupation: Mathematical Sciences Student @ Loughborough University Age: 20 Height: 1.74m Weight:  63kg What inspired you to take up Heptathlon? I’ve always dabbled in many sports, playing netball and hockey up to regional standard. When I was younger I also did triathlon, which I loved, but as the distances increased as I got older I figured it wasn’t for me. Now the furthest I have to run is 800m- result! My mother was a GB triathlete so I figured I had to go one better and take up heptathlon which entails seven events as opposed to three. Please describe a typical week’s training? This varies week on week depending on what time of the year it is, whether I have a competition at the weekend or often just down to how I feel. For example, at times when University work is particularly heavy I will have a slightly easier week. An average training week is usually 20+ hours, with additional time spent with massage, physios, podiatrists you name it. Here is a glance at last weeks training: Monday- Shot, Hurdles, Weights Tuesday- High jump, sprints session e.g. 4x 60m, 3x 90m, 2x 120m Wednesday- Hurdles, Javelin, aqua jogging or swim recovery Thursday- Shot, Long jump, 800m based running session e.g Split 800 (600/200) with 60 second recovery Friday- Weights, Yoga Saturday- 400m based running session e.g. 3x 300m , Javelin Sunday- Rest day often spent sleeping and eating Rest and recovery is crucial but not something I often enjoy doing, I like to be busy...
Paul Stewart Interview

Paul Stewart Interview

ROCKTAPE were incredibly proud last summer to support Paul Stewart, an ex-England Hockey Under-18 player who sustained an L1 spinal cord injury in December 2008 when an avalanche swept him 200ft off a cliff while skiing. He was instantly paralysed from the waist down and was told, aged just 27, that he would not walk again.  Still paralysed below the knee, Paul trained for 6 months to complete a truly awesome challenge that none of us here could even imagine undertaking. Despite the initial prognosis being nothing short of desperate regarding his chances of walking, Paul did regain enough limited muscle use to walk with the aid of leg braces and sticks and by using entirely different muscle groups to those normally employed in walking. Over 15 days, Paul would attempt his IronSpine Challenge, which would see him swim 2.4 miles, cycle 112 miles, walk 26.2 miles and then climb the cliff over which he was swept in 2008.  During a show of phenomenal determination and resilience, Paul completed the challenge and, in doing so, raise £400,000 for Spinal Research. Here, Paul talks us through the nuts and bolts of his epic journey. How quickly did you progress to walking again after the accident? It took 4 months of intensive physiotherapy and rehab before I managed my first steps.  It was a further 5 months before I was able to do anything that could be considered as walking and 1.5 years before I could walk as far as 500m in one go.  To this day my walking is slow, inefficient and cumbersome. Were you back to being active or...
Rocktape recently caught up with GB age-group and World Championship Silver Medal winning duathlete, Anthony Meager.

Rocktape recently caught up with GB age-group and World Championship Silver Medal winning duathlete, Anthony Meager.

Please describe a typical week’s training? Depending on the time of year, an average training week would consist of 25+ hours, split between swim, bike, run and gym work.  Structure is something that works really well for me, so I ensure each month, week or day is planned in great detail.  However, no training week is ever the same as the previous week.  This is something that keeps motivation high, therefore maintaining training interesting.  As the season approaches, training changes slightly, with race fitness becoming the main focus.  I love what I do and it wouldn’t be possible without the support from Rocktape and Odlo, two of the best sponsors that I cannot thank enough! What is your favourite training activity? I love all three aspects of my sport, but of course I do have a favourite.  The bike is my favoured discipline and I look forward to the long rides on my training programme every week.  The weather sometimes has a part to play and occasionally the turbo trainer acts as a replacement, but there is nothing better than riding up and down mountains on a training camp in the sun. What is you least favourite training activity? Training in England over the winter can be difficult at times, but with good mental strength nothing stops us.  Come about April time it is just about warm enough to start some open water swim training.  When the water is freezing and I am shivering, I realise this is definitely my least favourite training activity, especially when I get out and cannot feel my feet for hours.  If it was...
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